Liturgical Calendar

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The Liturgical Calendar and The New Missale Romanum

Introduction:

The liturgical commemorations of eighteen Saints have been newly included in the Universal Calendar of the recently revised Missale Romanum, edition typical tertia. Because the USA Liturgical Calendar is prepared two years in advance, these saints have not been included in the Liturgical Calendar for the Dioceses of the United States. Since the Missale Romanum, editio typical tertia and its calendar are in effect, however, the following notes are offered on the observance of these celebrations.

January 3rd: The Most Holy Name of Jesus

From Apostolic times, the Church has professed that “at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, of those in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Phil. 2:10). Through the particular efforts of St. Bernardine of Siena , devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus was promoted through the inscription of the monogram of the Holy Name (HIS) and the addition of the name Jesus to the Hail Mary. In 1597, Pope Sixtus V first granted an indulgence for the uttering of the phrase used so often by the present Holy Father and included among the pious invocations of the current Enchiridion Indulgentiarum: “Praised be Jesus Christ!”

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Votive Mass of the Holy Name of Jesus may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass (LFM) may be used for the celebration:

Phillipians 2: 1-11. (LFM 136a)

Psalm 8: 4-5.6-7.8-9. (LFM 753.1, with antiphon)

Alleluia: Matthew 1:21: She will bear a son and you are to name him Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.

Luke 2: 21-24 (not in LFM)

February 8th: Saint Josephine Bakhita, virgin

Saint Josephine was a young Sudanese girl sold into slavery and brought to Italy where, while serving as a nanny, she was sent to live with the Canossian Sisters of the Institute of the Catechumens in Venice . There she was baptized, and, having reached majority age, was granted her freedom by Italian law. In 1896 she joined the Canossian Daughters of Charity where she served humbly for the next twenty-five years. She died after a long and painful illness, during which she would cry out to the Lord: “Please loosen the chains… they are so heavy!” Her dying words were “Our Lady! Our Lady!”

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on February 8 along with Saint Jerome Emiliani. Prayer texts from the Common of Virgins may be used for this celebration.

Texts: The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

1 Corinthians 7: 23-35 (LFM 734.1)

Psalm 45: 11-12, 14-15, 16-17 (LFM 733.1, with the antiphon)

Alleluia: This is the wise virgin whom the Lord found watching; She went into the wedding feast with him when he came.

Matthew 25:1-13 (LFM 736.2)

April 23rd: Saint Adalbert, Bishop and Martyr

Saint Adalbert was ordained the Bishop of Prague in 983. During his episcopate he encouraged the evangelization of the Magyars. Having founded the monastery of Brevnov, he was forced into exile by the nobility of Prague . He tirelessly preached the Gospel in Poland , Hungary , Russia , and Prussia , where he was martyred at the age of 41.

Calendar: This optional memorial is recent to the USA liturgical calendar and is inscribed on April 23 along with Saint George.

Texts: Prayer texts from either the Common of Martyrs or the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. Readings for this celebration may be found in the Lectionary for Mass, no. 553a.

April 28th: Saint Louis Mary de Montfort, Priest

Saint Louis was born to a poor family in 1673 at Montfort-La-Cane in Brittany . Ordained at the age of 27, he was deeply devoted to the Blessed Virgin, as exemplified by his book The Secret of the Rosary, the first work to describe the method by which the Rosary is prayed even to our day. During his life he founded both a missionary band of men (Company of Mary) and a religious institute of women devoted to the poor (Congregation of the Daughters of Divine Wisdom).

Calendar: This optional memorial is recent to the USA liturgical calendar and is inscribed on April 28 th along with Saint Peter Chanel.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. Readings for this celebration may be found in the Lectionary for Mass, no. 556a.

May 13th: Our Lady of Fatima

The Blessed Virgin Mary is venerated under this title following apparitions to three shepherd children in Portugal in 1917. The message of Fatima includes a call to conversion of heart, repentance from sin and a dedication to the Blessed Virgin Mary, especially through praying the Rosary.

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on May 13.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common of Blessed Virgin Mary may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Isaiah 61: 9-11 (LFM 707.9)

Psalm 45: 11-12, 14-17 (LFM 709.3, with its antiphon)

Alleluia: Blessed are you, holy Virgin Mary and worthy of all praise., For the sun of justice, Christ our God, was born of you.

Luke 11:27-28 (LFM 712.10)

May 21st: Saint Christopher Magallanes, Priest, Martyr, and His Companions, Martyrs

Saint Christopher Magallanes was joined in martyrdom by twenty-one diocesan priests and three devout laymen, all members of the Cristeros movement, who rose up in rebellion against the anti-Catholic Mexican government during the 1920s. Having erected a seminary at Totatiche, he secretly spread the Gospel and ministered to the people. Captured by government authorities, he was heard to shout from his jail cell: “I am innocent and I die innocent. I forgive with all my heart those responsible for my death, and I ask God that the shedding of my blood serve the peace of our divided Mexico.”

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on May 21.

Texts: Prayer texts from either the Common of Martyrs or the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Revelation 7:9-17 (LFM 714.2)

Psalm 34:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9 (LFM 715.2)

Alleluia: Matthew 5: 10 (LFM 717.11)

John 12:24-26 (LFM 718.5)

May 22nd: Saint Rita of Cascia, Religious

Born in 1381 in the little town of Roccaporena , in the Province of Umbria , Italy , Saint Rita was married and raised two sons. After the violent murder of her husband, Saint Rita urged forgiveness in contrast to the customary vendetta of the day. She was, however, repeatedly denied entrance to the Augustinian nuns due to the constant threat of violent revenge by her husband’s relatives. Through her personal intercession a promise of forgiveness and peace was secured and she began forty years in prayer, contemplation and service to the sick and the poor. Toward the end of her life she received a wound from a thorn from the crown of thorns.

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on May 22.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common Holy Men and Women may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Philippians 4: 4-9 (LFM 740.10)

Psalm 1: 1-4, 6 R.2 (LFM 739.1)

Alleluia: Matthew 11:28 (LFM 741.5)

Luke 6: 27-38 (LFM 742.18)

July 9th: Saint Augustine Zhao Rong, Priest and Martyr, and His Companions, Martyrs

Saint Augustine Zhao Rong was a Chinese diocesan priest who was martyred with his 119 companions in 1815. Among their number was an eighteen year old boy, Chi Zhuzi, who cried out to those who had just cut off his right arm and were preparing to flay him alive: “Every piece of my flesh, every drop of my blood will tell you that I am Christian.”

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on July 9.

Texts: Prayer texts from either the Common of Martyrs of the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Ezekiel 34: 11-16 (LFM 719.9)

Psalm 23: 1-3, 4, 5, 6 (LFM 721.2)

Alleluia: John 10: 16: I am the good shepherd. A good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.

John 10: 11-18: I am the good shepherd. A good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.

July 24th: Saint Sharbel Makhluf, Priest

St. Sharbel was a Lebanese monk, born in a small mountain village and ordained in 1858. Devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he spent the last twenty three years of his life as a hermit. Despite temptations to wealth and comfort, Saint Sharbel taught the value of poverty, self-sacrifice and prayer by the way he lived his life.

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on July 24.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Sirach 3: 17-24 (LFM 737.13)

Psalm 15: 2-3ab, 3cd-4ab.5 (LFM 741.1)

Matthew 19: 27-29 (LFM 742.9)

August 2nd: Saint Peter Julian Eymard, Priest

Born in La Mure, France, Saint Peter became a parish priest in 1834 and joined the Marists five years later. He fostered Eucharistic adoration throughout his life and founded a religious order of priest-adorers of the Holy Eucharist who came to be known as the Priests of the Blessed Sacrament.

Calendar: This optional memorial is already inscribed on the USA liturgical calendar on August 2 nd along with Saint Eusebius of Vercelli .

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. Readings for this celebration may be found in the Lectionary for Mass (LFM 611a).

August 9th: Saint Teresiae Benedicta of the Cross, Virgin and Martyr

Edith Stein was born of Jewish parents in 1891, becoming an influential philosopher following her extensive studies at major German universities. Following her conversion to Catholicism she became a major force in German intellectual life, entering the Discalced Carmelites in 1933. Sister Teresa Benedicta was arrested by the Nazi regime in 1942, along with all Catholics of Jewish extraction and transported by cattle train to the death camp of Auschwitz . She died in the gas chambers at Auschwitz that same year.

Calendar: This celebration is already inscribed on the USA liturgical calendar with the rank of an obligatory memorial.

Texts: Prayer texts and readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be taken from the Common of Virgins or the Common of Martyrs.

August 14th: Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Priest and Martyr

Saint Maximilian became a Franciscan in 1907 and devoted his life to fostering devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary as a priest, a publisher and the founder of the “City of the Immaculate.” Sentenced to hard manual labor at Auschwitz , he offered his life in exchange for that of an innocent man. He is remembered for his prophetic words, “Hatred is not a creative force. Only love is a creative power.”

Calendar: This celebration is already inscribed on the USA liturgical calendar with the rank of an obligatory memorial.

Texts: Prayer texts for this celebration already exist in the Sacramentary for the dioceses of the United States of America . Readings for this celebration may be taken from the Common of Pastors: For Missionaries (see LFM, 636a).

September 12th: The Most Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary

God the Father is glorified by the exalted role in salvation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Thus, her name is a name of honor, a holy name, a maternal name and a name responsive to the needs of the Church. (See, Collection of Masses of the Blessed Virgin Mary, no. 21)

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on September 12th.

Texts: Prayer texts for this celebration already exist in the Collection of Masses of the Blessed Virgin Mary, no. 21.

The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Galatians 4: 4-7 (LFM 710.3)

or: Ephesians 1:3-6, 11-12 (LFM 710.4)

Response: Luke 1: 46-47, 48-49, 50-51, 52-53, 54-55 (LFM 709.5)

Ant. Blessed is the Virgin Mary, who has brought forth the Son of the eternal Father.

Alleluia: Luke 1: 45 (LFM 711.2)

Luke 1: 39-47 (LFM 712.5)

September 20th: Saint Andrew Kim Taegon, Priest and Martyr, Saint Paul Chong Hasang, Martyr, and Their Companions, Martyrs

Saint Andrew was born in Seoul, Korea to converts to the faith. His father was a martyr. Baptized at the age of 15, he traveled 1300 miles to the nearest seminary in South China and was ordained Korea’s first native priest. In 1846 he was tortured and beheaded along with his lay associate, St. Paul Chong Hasang. Between 1839 and 1867, 113 martyrs gave their lives for the faith in Korea.

Calendar: This celebration is already inscribed on the USA liturgical calendar with the rank of an obligatory memorial.

Texts: Prayer texts for this celebration already exist in the Sacramentary for the dioceses of the United States of America. Readings for this celebration may be found in the Lectionary for Mass, no. 642a.

September 23rd: Saint Pio of Pietreclina, Priest (Padre Pio)

“Padre Pio” was born in 1887 in the small Italian village of Pietrelcina. He joined the Capuchin Friars at the age of sixteen and was ordained a priest seven years later. For fifty years at the monastery of San Stefano Rotundo he was a much sought after spiritual advisor, confessor and intercessor whose life was devoted to the Eucharist and prayer. Yet despite such notoriety, he would often say “I only want to be a poor friar who prays.”

Calendar: While this celebration was not included in the new Missale Romanum, Pope John Paul II announced on June 16, 2002 that the “liturgical commemoration of Saint Pio of Pietrelcina will be inserted in the Roman Calendar to be observed as an obligatory memorial on 23 September, the day of this birth in heaven.” This celebration is new to the USA Liturgical Calendar.

Texts: Prayer texts and readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be taken from the Common of Pastors.

September 28th: Saint Lawrence Ruiz, Martyr, and His Companions, Martyrs

Saint Lawrence was a devoted husband and father of three children in the Philippines during the seventeenth century. After he was unjustly accused of murder, he fled with Christian missionaries to Japan where he was tortured for the faith and died professing: “I shall die for God, and for him I would give many thousand of lives if I had them.”

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on September 28 along with Saint Wenceslaus.

Texts: Prayer texts from the Common of Martyrs may be used for this celebration. Readings for this celebration may be taken from the Common of Martyrs (see LFM 645a).

November 24th: Saint Andrew Dung Lac, Priest and Martyr, and His Companions, Martyrs

St. Andrew was one of 117 people who were martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. The last of the martyrs were 17 laypersons, one of them a 9-year-old, executed in 1862.

Calendar: This celebration is already inscribed on the USA liturgical calendar and is inscribed on November 24.

Texts: Prayer texts from either the Common of Martyrs or the Common of Pastors may be used for this celebration. Readings for this celebration may be taken from the Common of Martyrs of the Common of Pastors (see LFM 683a).

November 25th: Saint Catherine of Alexandria, Virgin and Martyr

This martyr was a learned woman of the early fourth century, who, following her conversion at the age of eighteen, preached the Gospel throughout Alexandria in Egypt. While imprisoned by the emperor Maximus, she converted both the empress and the leader of the armed forces and for this she was martyred.

Calendar: This optional memorial is new to the USA liturgical calendar and will be inscribed on November 25.

Texts: Prayer texts from either the Common of Martyrs or the Common of Virgins may be used for this celebration. The following readings from the Lectionary for Mass may be used for this celebration:

Revelation 21: 5-7 (LFM 714.4)

Psalm 123: 2-3. 4-5. 7b-8 (LFM 715.3)

Alleluia: We praise you, O God, we acknowledge you to be Lord; the noble army of martyrs praise you, Oh Lord. (LFM 717.6)

Matthew 10: 28-33 (LFM 718.2)

The previous article on The Liturgical Calendar and the New Missale Romanum is available for free download in a convenient table format on the BCL website (www.usccb.org/liturgy).

© 2002, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. All rights reserved.