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Posted: Fri., July 22, 2016

By William Cone 

Editor

Substance abuse is a major problem in American society, with nearly an estimated 23 million suffering from addiction. Pennsylvania ranks in the top 20 in deaths from drug overdose.

It’s no wonder that Catholics in the Diocese of Pittsburgh saw the need to offer a support program for addicts and their loved ones.

Posted: Fri., July 22, 2016

By Grettelyn Darkey

In August, nearly 500 people are expected to gather at Slippery Rock University to celebrate the life and work of one great thinker and writer. They will spend three days listening to presentations by such notable figures as Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles, Dale Ahlquist of EWTN fame and Tim Powers, best-selling writer of horror and fantasy fiction. They will discuss the man who brought them together and whose ideas continue to influence their lives. Some of them will even be drawn closer to Christ by their encounter with this man’s enduring legacy.

Posted: Fri., July 22, 2016

By JOHN FRANKO 

Staff Writer

The 36 incoming freshmen who will make up the Crossroads Class of 2020 scurried through the streets of Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood July 1 in a scavenger hunt that helped them understand the values they will learn as part of the intensive high school program.

Posted: Fri., July 15, 2016

The events of these days have riveted our attention. Hatred, violence and anger are contagious. Our love and respect for one another must be more contagious.

Every person is an individual. We must not judge any person based on their race or color, their national origin, their faith tradition, their politics, their sexual orientation, their job, their vocation, their uniform.

Posted: Fri., July 15, 2016

By JOHN FRANKO

 Staff Writer

Bishop David Zubik said that when he joins other faithful at World Youth Day in Krakow, Poland, they will learn from Pope Francis — and Jesus — what it means to use their hearts not as weapons but as instruments of love — to look into each other’s eyes as Jesus looks into our eyes.

“In 13 days, we go on a pilgrimage of peace and love and mercy,” he said during a World Youth Day send-off Mass July 11 at St. Paul Cathedral in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood.

Posted: Fri., July 15, 2016

By JOHN FRANKO 

Staff Writer

Father Walt Rydzon said the violence that has staggered the United States begged the question: How far are we willing to go to show mercy?

“Think about it,” he said. “It’s not about color. It’s about mercy.”

The same is true when it comes to dealing with people who have disabilities. While they don’t face the social discrimination they did 60 years ago, there is still the tendency to think, “What’s wrong with you?”

“It’s not about disabilities,” he noted. “It’s about mercy.”

Posted: Fri., July 15, 2016

Many moons ago, when I taught seniors at Quigley Catholic High School in Baden, I developed a course titled “Christian Lifestyles.” It was a one-semester required course for those students in their last year of high school preparing for graduation.

Posted: Fri., July 15, 2016

By Dr. Susan Muto

Were we asked to recite the Great Commandment we might say without hesitation: love the Lord your God with your whole heart and soul, and love your neighbor as you love yourself. On our own or with some polite prompting we might be able to remember the Ten Commandments and the eight beatitudes, the “must-do” list from the Old and New Testaments.

What we are inclined to overlook, however, are the little commandments given to us by Jesus to draw us from the baby steps of discipleship to the deep dimensions of becoming “other Christ’s.”

O Jesus, our great High Priest, Hear my humble prayerson behalf of your priest, Father [N]. Give him a deep faith, a bright and firm hopeand a burning love which willever increase in the course of his priestly life.

Posted: Mon., July 11, 2016

By JOHN FRANKO 

Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — It was at the Last Supper, Bishop David Zubik said, that Jesus gave the apostles a peace that no one else could give and that no one else could take away.

“He was giving them the freedom to equally and together stand up for the ultimate truth — who is Jesus Christ himself,” he said.

It is a freedom, he added, that faithful must have the “guts” to stand up for if they are to be visible signs of that truth.